Attending the Summit and Looking for Information?

You should have received an email from the Coaching Summit team last week. In that email was a link to an orientation page to help orient you to your Summit experience. We emailed the link only to Summit participants since much of the information can not be shared publicly (presentation downloads, participant roster, and more). If you did not receive this email, please contact me and I will send the link to you again. Enjoy the Summit!

Best Regards,
Dwayne A. Butcher
Representing the Summit Teams
from LEI and Lean Frontiers

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http://www.leancoachingsummit.com/images/indexw2.gifThe Need for Coaching…

Most lean practitioners have heard the principle “Before we make product, we make people.” This embodies respect for people and describes the two responsibilities of every leader: Get work done and develop people. To accomplish these as separate activities is difficult, if not impossible. So the lean leader’s solution is to develop people through getting the work done. Easy to say, but what does it take? It takes coaching. And it takes a culture of coaching to be enterprise-wide.

What is Coaching?

Coaching involves the fine art of mentoring, guiding, teaching; whatever you call it, it’s helping others think and act in specific ways toward specific goals. And it involves two distinct groups:

  • Coaches develop and utilize an ever-growing depth of experience in lean thinking, and an understanding of lean tools and their proper application. Perhaps more importantly, coaches must possess skills in communicating, teaching, motivating and inspiring those they serve.
  • Those being coached must understand their unique role and how it fits into the larger vision. They need new ways of thinking and behaving which don’t always come naturally. Problem solving, a drive to learn, and a willingness to experiment are just a few of the characteristics needed.  Gaining this understanding, of course, is dependent upon good coaching.

So… A Coaching Summit!

goboThe Lean Enterprise Institute and Lean Frontiers again offer to the lean community the annual Lean Coaching Summit, now entering its third year. The Summit will continue to lay the groundwork for coaching in the lean enterprise through a collaborative and hands-on learning environment. The Summit’s mission is to move the lean enterprise from a vision of coaching excellence to reality, resulting in everyone in your organization being touched by persistent and patient coaching.

Learn by Doing… And Networking!

“Learn by doing” is not only key to lean thinking, but it’s the foundation of the Lean Coaching Summit. The Summit offers two days of lean coaching theory, practical application, case studies, and inspirational keynotes. And this year features optional, full-day, intensive workshops that offer deep dives into subjects of interest to your and your organization. Participants will have ample opportunity to put into practice the skills that they learn. And this practice will take place in a rich networking environment. Learn from pioneering presenters who are the leading thinkers and doers of lean coaching. Hear their stories of what has worked, and sometimes more importantly, what hasn’t worked. And at the same time build a network of peers to learn from at the Summit and beyond.

The 3rd Annual Lean Coaching Summit will continue to foster this emerging movement and serve as a catalyst for further and deeper thinking and practice on the subject. Be on the leading-edge of those exploring the simple yet powerful tool of coaching in the lean enterprise.

TOPICS COVERED WHO SHOULD ATTEND
  • Lean as a learning system
  • Patterns of behavior and thinking that lead to a workforce of problem solvers
  • How to assess your personal effectiveness as coach
  • Questioning as a critical and learnable skill
  • The role of servant leadership in the lean coaching model
  • The optimal situation – coaches developing coaches
  • TWI’s role in developing front-line supervisors
  • Management practices that stifle lean thinking
  • Lean project leaders
  • Lean coordinators
  • Lean change agents
  • Continuous improvement executives
  • Six Sigma black belts
  • Staff experts
  • Leaders, change agents, managers, lean experienced executives, service operations, healthcare, or non-profits

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